Author Archives: edwardtyler

About edwardtyler

I live in Kintyre, the long peninsula acting as a natural breakwater for the Firth of Clyde, west of Glasgow. A Permaculture and Transition practitioner, I am working with fellow community activists to co-create a resilient and vibrant local bioregion.

Nature unchecked

I am always bowled over by the complexity of life forms in places where biodiversity is allowed to express itself. One of those places is Bishop Middleham quarry in Co. Durham. The quarry has been abandoned for 80 or so

Nature unchecked

I am always bowled over by the complexity of life forms in places where biodiversity is allowed to express itself. One of those places is Bishop Middleham quarry in Co. Durham. The quarry has been abandoned for 80 or so

More rewilding, less sitka

The Scottish Government has now recognised that there is a Climate Emergency. One of the ways it says it will respond is by the mass planting of trees. This intention is simplistic and speaks to an unhelpful attitude towards the

More rewilding, less sitka

The Scottish Government has now recognised that there is a Climate Emergency. One of the ways it says it will respond is by the mass planting of trees. This intention is simplistic and speaks to an unhelpful attitude towards the

Resilient Land: 4 key habitats

In previous posts I’ve explored four key habitats of my bioregion: Peatlands, Freshwater, Scrub and Celtic rainforest. Unfortunately they are far from flourishing at the moment, but if the situation were to change they would make a big contribution to

Resilient Land: 4 key habitats

In previous posts I’ve explored four key habitats of my bioregion: Peatlands, Freshwater, Scrub and Celtic rainforest. Unfortunately they are far from flourishing at the moment, but if the situation were to change they would make a big contribution to

Aspen – help it thrive

On Saturday Carina went on an Aspen workshop run by Peter Livingstone of Eadha (Gaelic for Aspen). She was so inspired that the next day we went to a stand near Ferry Wood and took some root cuttings, which she

Aspen – help it thrive

On Saturday Carina went on an Aspen workshop run by Peter Livingstone of Eadha (Gaelic for Aspen). She was so inspired that the next day we went to a stand near Ferry Wood and took some root cuttings, which she

RL4 – Bracken

Bracken is abundant in the Highlands. It is seen as a scourge, since sheep, cattle and horses won’t eat it. Let’s look at the ecological niche it naturally occupies. Surprisingly perhaps, it is a woodland plant, yet can only grow

RL4 – Bracken

Bracken is abundant in the Highlands. It is seen as a scourge, since sheep, cattle and horses won’t eat it. Let’s look at the ecological niche it naturally occupies. Surprisingly perhaps, it is a woodland plant, yet can only grow

RL3 – Atlantic Woodland

The West Coast of Scotland, being wet and relatively warm all year thanks to the influence of the Atlantic, is home to Celtic Rainforest (so-named because it is also found on the west coast of Ireland and other ocean-facing coasts

RL3 – Atlantic Woodland

The West Coast of Scotland, being wet and relatively warm all year thanks to the influence of the Atlantic, is home to Celtic Rainforest (so-named because it is also found on the west coast of Ireland and other ocean-facing coasts

RL2 – bring back the Beaver

Our boglands slowly release the water held within the masses of sphagnum; the water comes together in burns flowing down towards the sea, never far away. In some areas there are a few miles of low-lying ground and it is

RL2 – bring back the Beaver

Our boglands slowly release the water held within the masses of sphagnum; the water comes together in burns flowing down towards the sea, never far away. In some areas there are a few miles of low-lying ground and it is